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Shane Baylis

PhD Candidate

Genotypic structure of seabird populations and their colonisation events at Ashmore Islands

 

Shane shares membership in the Clarke and Sunnucks Labs. He has a BSc and an MSc in Biological Sciences from the University of Auckland, and is still haunted by the Statistics major he picked up as an undergraduate. To wit, when he wasn't researching nest predation by rats, he spent his MSc researching the biases in widely-used estimates of different species' maximum longevities.

He worked in Post-mortem and Pathology for the 2011 - 2012 Rena oil spill, where he had the opportunity to work on both seabirds and whales. After the spill, he opted to study seabirds, opining that: “A data point, to be usable, should weigh no more than a few kilograms. Whales are a mug's game.” Accordingly, for his PhD he studies terns and noddies – the lightest seabirds studied by anyone in the Clarke lab.

When Shane is not doing Science, he enjoys SCUBA, bicycle maintenance, baking, and indoor rock-climbing. He blogs at http://thisblogrepelselephants.wordpress.com/

 

Publications

Hodgson, J., Baylis, S.M., Mott, R.M., Herrod, A. and Clarke, R.H. (2016). Precision wildlife monitoring using unmanned aerial vehicles. Scientific Reports doi:10.1038/srep22574

Baylis, S., de Lisle, M., & Hauber, M. (2014). Inferring maximum lifespan from maximum recorded longevity in the wild carries substantial risk of estimation bias. Ecography 37:1-11.

Shane M. Baylis, Phillip Cassey, and Mark E. Hauber. (2012). Capsaicin as a deterrent against introduced mammalian nest predators. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 124:518-524

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